Swedish-born producer and DJ known as Avicii has been found dead in Oman.

The musician – born Tim Bergling – was 28.

Avicii was known as a pioneer of the Electronic Dance Movement. He was one of the most successful and influential DJs in the electronic music industry.

“It is with profound sorrow that we announce the loss of Tim Bergling, also known as Avicii,” Baron said. “He was found dead in Muscat, Oman this Friday afternoon local time, April 20th. The family is devastated and we ask everyone to please respect their need for privacy in this difficult time. No further statements will be given.”

Tim Bergling was a very humble young man. There are numerous witnesses about his strong drive to help others.

Tonight at 24 all Swedish nightclubs and discotecs went quiet in a tribute to Avicii.

Today the UN Secretary-General António Guterres and UN ambassadors from the 15 member states of the UN Security Council arrives to my home region Skåne in Sweden for a work meeting at former Secretary General Dag Hammarskjöld’s house Backåkra, just a few kilometers from my home.

Dag Hammarskjöld was appointed UN Secretary General in 1953. He bought the property Backåkra in 1957 and was planning to settle there after completion of the mission in the United Nations, but it did not happen since he died in an air crash in Ndola, present Zambia in 1961.

It is the first time in history that a UN Security Council meeting is held outside the UN building in New York. It is done as a tribute to a legendary leader and one of the most popular Secretary Generals ever, Dag Hammarskjöld.

The UN Security Council has fifteen members. Five of them are permanent members: France, China, Russia, Great Britain and the United States.

Then there are ten non-permanent members who are elected five at a time every two years.

These are reserved for the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2018: Bolivia, Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands and Sweden These are reserved for the period 1 January 2018 to 31 December 2019: Equatorial Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kuwait, Peru and Poland.

The Security Council is one of the UN’s six main bodies. The other five are the General Assembly, the Economic and Social Council, the Secretariat, the International Court and the Trusteeship Council. The latter, however, has been resting since 1994.

There is only. One song that can be the best ever made. For me it is easy. I heard this song the first time in 1975. I was eleven years old at the time. Since then, and forever, it is the best song ever made. Layla.

Layla is a song written by Eric Clapton and Jim Gordon, originally released by their blues rock band Derek and the Dominos, as the thirteenth track from their album Layla and Other Assorted.

The Yardbirds’ manager, Giorgio Gomelsky, gave Eric Clapton the nickname “Slowhand” in early 1964. Clapton is the best rock’n roll guitarist in history.

Click here: Derek and the Dominoes: Layla

HM Revenue & Customs chief executive confirms several major programmes will be affected due to prioritising development of new customs IT systems

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) plans to stop or delay a number of its transformation programmes to ensure it has the capability and capacity to complete its new Customs Declaration Services (CDS) project in time for Brexit.

CDS is intended to replace the current Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (Chief) system for handling freight from outside the European Union (EU). After Brexit, HMRC is expecting to see an increase in customs declarations from the current 60 million a year to 255 million, which Chief cannot handle.

MPs on the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) expressed concerns in January 2018 that HMRC was dangerously overstretched through a combination of 15 major transformation programmes and the uncertainty around requirements to update systems for the UK leaving the EU.

“What was already a precarious high-wire act is now being battered by the winds of Brexit, with potentially catastrophic consequences,” said committee chair Meg Hillier at the time.

HMRC chief executive Jon Thompson subsequently wrote to Hillier, and in his letter, published by PAC last week, he confirmed there will be changes to other key projects.

“As discussed at the last Public Accounts Committee hearing in October 2017, HMRC was to review the entirety of our transformation programme, including the need to accommodate Brexit-related projects and programmes. That review was completed in January 2018,” said Thompson in the letter.

“At this stage, I can say we have proposed a number of projects which should stop or not start, and a number which should be stretched out over a longer timescale,” he said. “I hope we can provide further transparency of the detail of this in due course. Our assessment is that if these changes are agreed then the resultant portfolio is deliverable, with appropriate level of risk. Also, that we have the capacity and capability to deliver it, or can obtain those capabilities in an appropriate timescale.”

When asked by Computer Weekly for further details of which programmes it plans to stop or delay as a result of its review, HMRC said, “We do not have any further information to give at this time on our reprioritisation, timescales or which projects we may be delaying” beyond the details in Thompson’s letter.

HMRC kjtends to begin phading in CDS in August, while running the old Chief system alongside it, and is due to be fully rolled out by early 2019.

Thompson said in his letter that the first phase of testing for CDS was completed in January, with a second phase due to complete this month. End-to-end performance testing will then take place, until live implementation starts in July.

“This testing will continue after July to test how each phase of migration from Chief to CDS is performing, leading up to full service deployment in January 2019. This work is highly complex and is a key focus for CDS delivery,” he said.

HMRC already had plans to replace the 25-year-old Chief system when the country voted to leave the EU. However, with Brexit approaching, CDS has become an increasingly important part of the UK’s ability to handle the huge increase in customs transactions expected once the UK leaves the EU Customs Union.

Concerns had been mounting that the systen won’t be ready for – or able to cope with – the volume of transactions needed when the UK leaves the EU.

In March 2017, the Treasury Committee said it had lost confidence in the successful implementation of CDS, and in July 2017, the National Audit Office warned there was “still a significant amount of work to complete” which meant CDS might not be ready in time for the UK’s exit from the EU on 29 March 2019.

In September 2017, however, the project reached the halfway point after making significant progress.

Thompson told the PAC meeting in October that he was confident CDS was on track, but said there were “no guarantees on technology projects”.

“We can be reasonably confident, but we need to be transparent with you. There are four significant risks to this programme, and any one of those could either delay the project or, worst case scenario, CDS wouldn’t be ready,” he said at the time.

“If we don’t manage those risks, this will either get delayed or go off track. It’s currently going well, but I will never give you a guarantee any IT system is going work until after [go-live].”

Source: ComputerWeekly

He is a superstar and it is all about showbiz.

Here is the hillarious interview from the Jimmy Kimmel Show. The King is in the U.S.A.

Link to the Jimmy Kimmel Show

Online shoppers in Sweden Are since March 1st 2018 forced to pay VAT on all items purchased from outside the EU.

PostNord, Sweden’s national carrier, was told by the Swedish Customs Authority to collect VAT on all non-EU packages, including thousands of packages that arrive from China every day.

The changed rules came after a än audit done by Swedish Customs. After review and investigation Customs called a meeting with PostNord to address the loss of billions of Euros due to unpaid consumer VAT.

Tje Swedish Customs Authority and PostNord had different interpretations of legislation, so PostNord was releasing and delivering parcels from countries outside the EU worth less than €22 ($27 USD) to shoppers without asking them to pay VAT.

The VAT will now instead be paid from the first Euro on all items ordered from outside the European Union.

PostNord will also charge an administration fee per package – in line with Postal Regulations – and the buyer will pay both VAT and administration fee even if the product only costs 10 kronor (€1 or $1.20 USD) like items from popular Chinese websites AliExpress and Wish.  The fee will be between 75 and 125 SEak (125 SEK is approx. €12 or $15 USD),

Many experts are convinced that this is the first step towards a new paradigm and approach towards low value parcels, the postal exceptions and eCommerce, which has been the elephant in the room for a very long time.

Have we sen the first domino brick fall?